Don’t Look Up๐Ÿ’ซ๐ŸŒŽ

It’s hard to imagine a more lucid depiction of reality or unreality (whatever the hell we’re supposed to call it) in the 21st century. This film has got everything going on. Upon 1st viewing I hereby pledge to see it again and again. Up? Down? I’ll look wherever the hell you want me to Mr. McKay. Nuff said E.F.

Its on Netflix

12 thoughts on “Don’t Look Up๐Ÿ’ซ๐ŸŒŽ

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  1. I was intrigued by the movie like you and many others. I found a bit of irony that exists outside its frame. It is a movie, after all, a form of media.

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      1. So, the fundamental problem is that Plato’s dialogues are not real life, but rather “representations” of real-life conversations. JUST like movies. Aha, I see the connection! The writer invents the conversations, and therefore we can’t say they are real life, factual. Right?

        Now why did Plato write dialogues? His intent, according to the author, is for the dialogues to “mirror
        the readerโ€™s dispositions, but in such a way, it seems to me, as to
        encourage reflection on and improvement of those dispositions.” It’s the same reason filmmakers like Adam McKay write satire, to be a mirror to humanity. Sometimes a black mirror.

        Plato’s dialogues are all modeled in the spirit of Socrates’ teachings that truth is not to be instructed, but to be REALIZED through interaction. Socrates who said, “”the highest point of my art is the power to prove by every test whether the offspring of a young man’s thought is a false phantom or an instinct with life and truth.” (Theaetetus)

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      1. I actually really enjoyed Jennifer’s and Leo’s characters. Such a pure intent to try to warn the world about the comet – and they were both so likeable and quirky. I also really enjoyed the unlikely bond she had with Timothy’s character. It was so cute.

        Liked by 1 person

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